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Golf WRX

1 Leg Hip Hinge

Golf WRX Article- October 1st, 2016

Load and Explode

As you may have seen, I have been featured on Golf WRX with another article. This article is titled           “3 Drills to train a more efficient turn in your golf swing” and is all about creating a better stretch-reflex.  To read the full article, you can check it out HERE.

The Article from Golf WRX

We have all heard the phrase “load and explode,” but what does that mean? Well, “loading” is all about stretching into the muscle tissue before “exploding” or contracting that muscle tissue to create movement. It’s my working theory that if golfers can learn how to better load few key areas (ankles, hips, and the core, to name a few), they can improve their consistency and performance on the course.

In the video, I offer three exercises that can help golfers train a more efficient turn in their swing. They use something called eccentric loading, a component of flexibility. Typically when we think of flexibility, our thoughts go to muscle length. While that is important, it is also essential to have good elasticity of that muscle tissue, which is what eccentric loading is all about.

The goal of eccentric loading is to create elasticity through a stretch reflex, so the exercises require golfers to focus on the stretch portion of the patterns, or “loading.” Doing so can help them learn how to better load their achilles/calves, lateral hamstrings, glutes, obliques and core, which can improve their ability to deliver the club on the right path and help prevent swing faults such as early extension, sway/slide and reverse spine angle.

Keep in mind that both muscle elasticity and length are important, and for that reason I always recommend that golfers see a certified golf fitness instructor for an assessment to address each golfer’s specific needs.

For more information on golf fitness and fitness in general, check outwww.roykhouryfitness.com or feel free to email me royfkhoury@gmail.com

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Warming Up for Golf

Lumbar locked trunk rotation

Golfers! Looking for a great warm up to do before your workout, or even your round?

Check out this quick, yet simple yet challenging warm up routine for you core!

It’s a great way to warm up your core in all 3 planes of motion:

  1. Flexion
  2. Extension
  3. Rotation

Give these drills a shot and let me know how you like them!

If you are interested in getting a evaluation and finding drills that are specific to your needs, we can set up either an in person or online session.

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Remodel Time!!!

After 2.5 years we are remodeling the studio! Stay tuned for more information on new classes, workshops and training!

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How to Create Rotational Strength

Lumbar locked trunk rotation

Learning to rotate through the proper areas/joints is something we spend a good bit of time refining with our golfers.  Learning to access the core and stabilize lower body against upper body movement- and vise versa- is pretty important when it comes to functional strength (click here for an article on functional strength).

Below is an example of what a basic mini program for Rotational Strengthtrunk rotation drill

Above is the start position for lumbar locked thoracic rotation.

Lumbar locked trunk rotation

Trunk rotation from a short kneeling position

The first drill focuses on mobility of the trunk (thoracic spine) which tends to be sticky for most people. It’s called a lumbar locked trunk rotation. The idea is to work for more rotation from the thoracic spine and rob cage while protecting the lower back.

 

 

In the finished position, you should push through the down arm to create extension as well as rotation. Remember the spine likes to straighten out or extend and rotate.

 

 

Oblique loading drill

This is a core drill to promote rotation through the lower body and core

 

The next drill is called a mountain climber with cross body rotation.  This is great drill to teach proper loading and unloading of the obliques.

 

Push Up Position (elevated)

This is starting point for this drill

 

 

I like this as a rotational drill for training upper body and arm stability with core driven lower body rotation.

 

 

 

These are 2 of the drills expanded upon, if you watch the video above you will see a couple more that require lower body stability and upper body driven movement.  This is a very short and basic routine but is pretty effective on checking off a lot of boxes for a golfer’s common needs for creating rotational strength. Feel free to reach out for an evaluation or a session specific to you.

 

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QUALITY OF MUSCLE TISSUE

If you have worked with me, you have probably heard the “beef jerky” talk. Here’s the typical scenario:

Me: Hows it going today?
Client: Good but my _____ hurts (you can put in knee, neck, shoulder, back etc)
Me: Hows your water been?
Client: Well could be better…
Me: Have you been foam rolling
Client: No I didn’t have time so I got straight into my workouts

This is about where I stop, and ask:
Me: Do you know what beef jerky is?
Client: Well, yeah
Me: So what is it? How is it made?
Client: *Smiling and thinking where is he going with this* It meat that is dried out, dehydrated
Me: Exactly

You may have heard at some point in your life that you are made of 70-80% water, which is completely correct. OUr bodies use water for our circulatory system, digestive system, and even for movement. Most of your water should be stored in your muscle tissue, so when you need extra digest a big meal or to keep your circulatory system moving it’s there. When you dehydrate or don’t hydrate enough, your body pulls water from any storage (i.e. muscles) to use for whatever it needs so you don’t shut down or pass out.

Being dehydrated makes your muscles tight and less pliable. Then add movement to that and getting sore from a workout and lactic acid build up from repetitive movement…guess what. You get knots in your muscles. When you have knots in your muscles that pulls on your joints in different angles, then guess what things wear down and…YOU HURT!

Something I have been adamant about for years has been foam rolling and hydration. Over the past few years working with various clients (golfers, martial artists, post rehab, general fitness), one thing stays constant people want to move better, feel better and look better. You don’t go to the gym to move shitty, feel shitty and look like shitty do you?

Mom I know you will read this so sorry for the language but this goes for you too 🙂

Let me put it to you this way, if you are tight you can’t move efficiently. If you can’t move efficiently but you do anyway, you get better at moving worse. If you continue to do that you get an injury, and that is not the goal of exercise.  The point of fitness is better health, not worse.

There’s a reason we go for the Filet Mignon over beef jerky…We don’t prefer to chew on leather if we don’t have to. That being said, hydrate, foam roll then move. In the short term you will feel better, in the long term will can move better and ultimately you will perform better.

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HOW DO YOUR SHOULDERS WORK?

Did you know your shoulder joint is the most mobile joint in your body? Your shoulder joint is the only joint that can flex (lift forward), extend (pull behind you), abduct (pull away from your body), adduct (pull into your body), rotate (both in towards the body and away from the body) and circumduct (move in circular patterns).

With all that movement, it’s no wonder why the shoulder joint is also one of the easiest joints to injure!

The shoulder joint is pretty complex and it’s not just the shoulder that makes all it’s movement happen.  Functionally speaking the shoulder girdle is where we get proper movement.

So you might be asking what’s the shoulder girdle?  Well the shoulder girdle breaks down into a few different bones, and they link together to provide stability to the entire shoulder region.

All the bones that affect the shoulder girdle function/movement:

-       Upper Arm (Humerus)

-       Shoulder Blade (Scapulae)

-       Collar Bone (Clavicle)

-       Upper Spine (Thoracic spine)

The upper arm (humerus) moves as a ball and socket joint with part of the shoulder blade and that is where we get most of our shoulder movement.  Without the shoulder girdle (shoulder blade, upper spine and collar bone) the shoulder would have nothing to stabilize it.  When the structure of the shoulder girdle does not stabilize the shoulder joint we typically see shoulder injury such as “grinding or clicking” noises and pains, rotator cuff tears, labrum tears, biceps tendonitis, etc.

If you have trained with me before, you have probably heard me say “all movement starts at the core” and I mean that.  In earlier articles we discussed what the core is and I defined it as everything excepts your arms and legs.  To me the shoulder girdle (shoulder blades, collar bones and upper spine) make up the top half of your core.  So whenever you start ANY upper body movement, you must stabilize you shoulder girdle (Chest up! Shoulders Back!) to allow your shoulder free motion without causing damage or pain.

To test what I mean, slouch as much as you can, then lift your arms as high up overhead as possible.  STAY SLOUCHED AND HOLD FOR A 5 COUNT.  What you should notice is… that it doesn’t feel good!  Imagine adding weight to that and doing it over and over again.  It’s painful and it will age you.

OK, let’s try it again, sit up as tall as possible and pinch your shoulder blades together and down, now lift your arms as high up overhead as possible.  YOU’RE YOUR SPINE TALL AND HOLD THOSE SHOULDER BLADES DOWN, FOR A 5 COUNT.  What you should notice is… MUSCLES WORKING!

When you slouch, your upper spine rounds and your shoulder blades slide as far from one another as they can.  This decreases shoulder stability.  Therefore when you move from the shoulder there is more possibility for pain and injury.