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Getting Golf Fit after 30

Roy Khoury Training in his Studio

How to get Golf Fit after the age of 30

 

Roy Khoury Training in his Studio

Roy Khoury Training in his Studio

We’ve all know the saying… “Getting old sucks”.  You wake up and your back hurts, your knees hurts, your neck hurts.   We blame it on getting old, but lets face it we trained like idiots in our teens and 20s (or did not train at all), and when we get into our 30’s we bust our butts trying to hold down a job, family and friends. With that we get to go to some fancy dinners out and maybe drink or two (maybe a little too regularly), and again we either continue to train like we did in our teens or 20’s or modify incorrectly or maybe avoid training altogether.  Old injuries, new pain, too much stress (mental, emotional, digestive, movement; there are different types of stress) and an increasing lack of time become our down fall.

Problem: We think we know and can do it all on our own

Answer:  Get an assessment.

1 Leg Hip Hinge

Load and Explode through the hips for a better turn in your golf swing.

 

  • I had to recently had a legal question I asked a lawyer client of mine and his initial response to me was, “You do you know why I hire you as a trainer? Because you are the expert! Don’t be stupid, get some legal council.”

    • The 30’s are the age in which we have to tackle a lot and take some risks but there are a few places where I would spend the money to do it once and do it right, 1) Movement 2) Medical 3) Skills coaching 4) Legal advice 5) Business advice

  • The guidance of a Movement Expert can up your game faster and more efficiently than trying it on your own. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24276303) Self directed workouts tend to fail more than 90% of the time (http://www.precisionnutrition.com/course-for-men-day-5-transcript) for multiple reasons. Anecdotally, most of my clients have failed in either, self directed movement, the wrong advice from the wrong source, or lack of motivation/goal setting.

Problem: Mismanagement of Time

Answer: Get a solid program

  • Having the correct program can help you identify your weak areas and I am not just talking about in your body, I am talking about how you spend your time working on your body.

  • Most of my clients walk out with strategy to work on that looks like this:

    • Must do list (stress management, movement regeneration, nutrition 101)

    • Should do list (Specific weight training to complement skill needs)

    • Can do list (the sexy stuff)

The goal is to be a little bit better everyday.

Problem: Mismanagement of Stress

Answer: Understand how different types of stress affect you

Eating clean helps with energy and focus

  • There is a great book out there by Robert Sapolsky called “Why Zebra’s Don’t Get Ulcers” read that or download it as an audible book.

  • If reading a book isn’t up your ally, check out this TED talk on stress management

Andy Puddicombe: All it takes is 10 mindful minutes

https://www.ted.com/talks/andy_puddicombe_all_it_takes_is_10_mindful_minutes

  • Stress management is one of the biggest issues I help people realize and find strategies to deal with in my 30 yr and older clients (and sometimes even my junior golfers- talk about stress management!).  We cover a variety of topics from mental, emotional, digestive, and movement stress. Stress is a huge road block that can stifle our fitness and athletic goals.

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How Should I Practice?

How Should I Practice?

How do you practice your swing? Did you know that how you practice can affect how you learn?  What we do can either help gain/retain skills or hinder your progress altogether.  With that being said, there are a couple of different ways we can practice to acquire or improve a skill and they are:

Blocked Practice-

We’ve all done it, gone to the range got a large bucket and went after it hitting the same club over and over again mindlessly.  It great when you are first starting out as it teaches/trains the left side of the brain which is responsible for sequence and order. Left brain training really likes order like: A, B, C, D… and is great for someone just starting out or really trying to refine a feel but will quickly lose its effectiveness if over used. Great for training how to grip the club, or setup routine, but quickly loses effectiveness when hitting shot after shot.

This is a photo of Roy Khoury and Tim Mitchell, PGA Roy_Khoury_Fitness

Randomized Practice-

Random practice is practicing how you would play. So you can either use playing a few holes as random practice or even use a range session to practice different distances or shot shapes with the same club, or utilizing a different club per shot. Random practice is more like actually playing golf, and actually helps you build the ability to problem solve while working on your skill.

When you are new to a sport or movement its good to challenge the left brain in repetition, logical and objective goal setting.  When you are proficient with your task, random practice helps challenge the right brain and its creativity, thought and performance. That being said, both types of practice are helpful for acquiring and improving your game, they just access different parts of the brain and challenge you in different ways, so its good to understand both and how both can help you.  See how it works for you!

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What should I eat on course?

Eating clean helps maximize our energy and focus on the course

One of the most consistent questions I get asked is, why do I run out of gas about hole 12/13/14?  More often then not people will blame their cardio, when really, they never properly fueled their body before or during their round. Regardless of your level of play, optimizing your fuel is one of the most basic and easy things you can do.

What to eat before, and during the round can be one of those factors that changes your focus, energy, and level of play.

First rule of thumb:

  1. Eat a good meal before you play. You might have to play with what works for you, but I like to have a good meal before I play. I try for something that consists of good protein and fats and some fibrous carbs. Think eggs, bacon and some sautéed spinach, versus a bowl of oatmeal or a protein shake. I want something that is going to stick to the ribs and not play havoc on my blood sugar levels.
  2. Snack throughout the round. I like to have something small every few holes. Think about packing a sandwich that is cut in half- eat half now and half for later. Pack good quality nuts and some easy to eat veggies like broccoli or baby carrots. The idea here is not to stuff yourself, but rather we are trying to “top off your fuel” before you run out.
  3. Two bottles of water. I like to have 1 bottle of good quality water with me at all times, and another bottle of water mixed with some branch chain amino acids or BCAA’s. The water is obvious, you have to stay hydrated especially if its hot or really windy and the BCAA’s can help satiate you and help with focus.

Food doesn’t have to be complicated, just prepared. This message especially goes out to my competitive juniors and adults. My goal is simple, lets take everything that makes golf more difficult out of the scenario so you can focus on your next shot. The last thing you need is to lose focus because you are hungry, thirsty, or tired.

Roy Khoury is the owner of Roy Khoury Fitness in Newport Beach, CA and is a Level 3 Certified Golf Fitness Instructor from TPI.

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Remodel Time!!!

After 2.5 years we are remodeling the studio! Stay tuned for more information on new classes, workshops and training!

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Random Thoughts

A couple of weeks ago, I spent some time in San Fransisco working and attending a seminar and had some time to reflect on things. I must say I feel pretty fortunate to be able to have a career that challenges me to learn, grow and want better for myself to better serve my clients.

Scotty, Chuck Taylor, and Team Titleist

Scotty, Chuck Taylor, and Team Titleist

The fact of the matter is, I am a teacher, plain and simple. I teach movement. Part of being a teacher is being student. If I cannot, learn and grow and expand my base how will I ever effectively teach? Part of being a teacher is crafting my expertise and helping a lot of people. That means I bust my ass working with clients and use much of my free to time trying to learn more from others that I look up to.

I am a 35 year old guy, that owns a fitness business dealing with golfers and their ability to compete pain free and excel at what they do. I do not sell sessions or packages, instead I sell my knowledge. I hold a college degree, and multiple advanced certifications and many many hours of continuing education that probably costs more than my college degree didi at this point- and I am not stopping. I want my studio to be a hub for education, so I have hosted seminars and am working on my own classes and seminars as well. I have dedicated the last 15 years of my life to get me to where I am today- and I am still growing and changed and understand that the more I know, really the more I have to learn. I started a business with the mindset of helping my community better themselves through movement to enhance their lives and their sport.

It’s a very fun, rewarding profession and I feel fortunate to be able to do what I do in this day and age. I help people move better so they can feel better and live life to the best of their ability. I just happen to like the game of golf and really enjoy working with golfers because I find for the most part, they put in the effort to want to listen, learn and put into action what I am teaching them.

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How do you practice?

Talking Movement and Golf Fitness

Roy Khoury speaking to the Southern California section PGA

How do you practice? Did you know that how you practice can affect how you learn? What we do can either help gain/retain skills or hinder your progress altogether. With that being said, there are a couple of different ways we can practice to acquire or improve a skill and they are:

Blocked Practice- Blocked practice is doing the same thing over and over again such as going to the driving range and hitting multiple driver shots. Blocked practice is a great way to learn a new skill since it gives the brain and body a single skill to process, but will quickly lose its effectiveness if over used.

Randomized Practice- Random practice is basically prating how you would play. SO you can either use playing a few holes as random practice or even practice different distance or direction shots with the same club. Random practice is more like actually playing golf, and actually helps you build the ability to problem solve while working on your skill.

When you are new to a sport or movement its good to challenge the left brain in repetition, logical and objective goal setting. When you are proficient with your task, random practice helps challenge the right brain and its creativity, thought and performance. That being said, both types of practice are helpful for acquiring and improving your game, they just access different parts of the brain and challenge you in different ways, so its good to understand both and how both can help you. See how it works for you!

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UPCOMING SEMINAR

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Attention Personal Trainers, Physical Therapist and Chiropractors

NeuroKinetic Therapy will be teaching a Level 1 course hosted by Joel Crandall at the Fit Fix Studio in Newport Beach, CA!

*We are currently working to provide those from out of town with a hotel solution near John Wayne and minutes from the Fit Fix Studio.  More details to come.

What is NKT:

NeuroKinetic Therapy corrective movement system, is a sophisticated assessment and treatment modality that addresses the causes of dysfunctional movement/coordination problems at their root in the motor control center in the cerebellum. The motor control center stores these patterns and directs their completion through the spinal cord and the muscles. The motor control center learns through failure.

Instructor:

Joel Crandall

When:

Saturday June 28th from 8am-4:30pm

Sunday June 29th from 8am-4:30pm

Where:

Fit Fix Studio, 3700 Campus Dr., Suite 100, Newport Beach, CA 92660

Course Info:

For detailed course info please see: Course Outlines

http://neurokinetictherapy.com/seminars/preparing-for-the-class

Payment Info: 

Early Registration: $600 if paid by 05/28/2014

Regular Registration: $700

http://neurokinetictherapy.com/seminars/upcoming-seminars-2

Click on 06/28-29 2014: Level 1 Two Day Course- Newport beach for payment options

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WE ARE MOVING!!

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Hey Everyone!

We are moving!! March 1st 2014 we will be moving to The Fit Fix Studio, located at 3700 Campus Drive, Suite 100 in Newport Beach, CA.

For more information, contact Roy Khoury at rkhoury@rfktraining.com or check out the Contact Page for a map and directions.

See you there!

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FUNDAMENTALS

I was fortunate enough to be apart of the 2013 Southern California section PGA Spring Teaching Summit this year along with Titleist and I learned a lot. This year Mark Blackburn (fellow TPI certified) presented on golf instruction and he brought up some great info on practice that I would like to share with you here.

I was impressed when Mark suggested the idea of practicing your swing without a ball. His reasoning was such that when we practice the golf swing we are practicing fundamentals (grip, alignment, posture, backswing pivot, and downswing pivot) . When we miss a shot its typically one of those factors that contribute to the miss hit. His goal as an instructor is to teach his students to understand where they went wrong so that the student can better self correct.

Fundamental drills such as grip, posture, backswing, etc are feel related therefore we should take the time to practice whatever cues we are given to better feel what we need to do. Mark’s suggestion is to practice these things without a ball to promote better focus on feeling what we need to. When we place a ball down on the range and hit it the distractions of ball flight, path, distance, etc over power our feel and we may or may not learn what we are trying to learn as a result. All that being said our practice sessions should include time for fundamental training (no ball practice), as well as ball striking practice. I have been using it and I am enjoying the outcome so far.

Try this the next time you go practice:

30 minutes session example

1) Fundamental Practice 1- Backswing NO Ball

2-3 min practicing backswing pivot. Feel your trail hip load every time you take your backswing.

Take a break for a couple of min to refocus, check your phone, etc

2) Fundamental Practice 2- Downswing NO Ball

2-3 min practicing downswing movement. Practice feeling a weight transfer from your trail leg into your lead leg through the downswing.

Take a break for a couple of min

3) Ball Striking- Random Shots

For the remainder of your time, pick a different club and different target for each swing.

Practicing this way is great because you take some time to develop feel with your fundamentals. Now remember what I listed above is just an example. I know my issues are in my backswing and downswing so I have been focusing on these drills. Your needs maybe different so add in what you are working on instead (grip, alignment, posture) and work with those with NO Ball to start your practice session and to develop a better feel. After your fundamental practice take random shots (varying clubs and target) rather than hitting the same shot over and over again. This is a great way to practice ball striking, after all you never take the same shot twice on the course.

**Edit** Mark just corrected me via twitter and said he does use the ball for some of his Fundamental Drills such as down swing and alignment, but at the summit did mention the using some drills without. I am waiting to hear back from him for some more clarification, but I do like the idea of no ball practice to develop feel.

***Edit*** Mark suggested using the ball in some fundamental drills particularly downswing and alignments

I would like to thank the Southern California section PGA for having RFK Training at the 2013 Spring Teaching Summit this year and I would also like to thank Mark Blackburn of Blackburn Golf for allowing me to assist you out there. I hope I am relaying your information out well!

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REFLEXIVE STABILITY

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Gray Cook (creator of the Functional Movement Screen and advisory board member of the Titleist Performance Institute) is a well recognized leader in the area of rehab, post rehab and performance training. I recently came across a great video clip that he put out regarding Stabilization Training. Its a quick video but its packed with a lot of great info. I use reflexive stability to help my golfers out all the time.  At the end of the day, golfers need to be in good alignment and a good position to have your brain reflexively fire to give you integrity. If you are out of position and your primary movers (aka mirror muscles) are firing to stabilize you, they cant do their job of moving leading to poor balance and mobility and ultimately compensation.

Check out the video below for some more info on it!

Enjoy!

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