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Random Thoughts

A couple of weeks ago, I spent some time in San Fransisco working and attending a seminar and had some time to reflect on things. I must say I feel pretty fortunate to be able to have a career that challenges me to learn, grow and want better for myself to better serve my clients.

Scotty, Chuck Taylor, and Team Titleist

Scotty, Chuck Taylor, and Team Titleist

The fact of the matter is, I am a teacher, plain and simple. I teach movement. Part of being a teacher is being student. If I cannot, learn and grow and expand my base how will I ever effectively teach? Part of being a teacher is crafting my expertise and helping a lot of people. That means I bust my ass working with clients and use much of my free to time trying to learn more from others that I look up to.

I am a 35 year old guy, that owns a fitness business dealing with golfers and their ability to compete pain free and excel at what they do. I do not sell sessions or packages, instead I sell my knowledge. I hold a college degree, and multiple advanced certifications and many many hours of continuing education that probably costs more than my college degree didi at this point- and I am not stopping. I want my studio to be a hub for education, so I have hosted seminars and am working on my own classes and seminars as well. I have dedicated the last 15 years of my life to get me to where I am today- and I am still growing and changed and understand that the more I know, really the more I have to learn. I started a business with the mindset of helping my community better themselves through movement to enhance their lives and their sport.

It’s a very fun, rewarding profession and I feel fortunate to be able to do what I do in this day and age. I help people move better so they can feel better and live life to the best of their ability. I just happen to like the game of golf and really enjoy working with golfers because I find for the most part, they put in the effort to want to listen, learn and put into action what I am teaching them.

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Functional Strength

Turkish Get Ups
Turkish Get Ups

Roy Khoury working with a juniors group class teaching get-ups

How do I obtain Functional Strength?

Do you strength train? I hope so. Strength is needed when building power especially for the golf swing.  If you aren’t lifting to improve your Functional Strength you might be strong but you aren’t going to optimize what you got.

What do I mean by that?
Functional strength- to me- means a couple of things:

  • Can you maintain a good spine position through your lifts?

I call it working on your “spinal hygiene”. Strength, and energy transference are highly dependent on you keeping a good spine through your sub maximal lifts. If not you will get stronger but it will be through cheating.

  • Do you train strength through all planes of motion?

The human body can move forward/backward, side to side, and in rotation. If you are an athlete, managing your body in balance and strength through all these ranges of motion becomes important. Depending on your sport, some planes of motion can be more important than other but guess what functional strength takes this into consideration.

  • Is your body in balance with strength?

To check balance of strength, one assessments I might start with is from the Titleist Performance Institute (www.myTPI.com). This test looks at the athlete’s ability to demonstrate strength, speed and power for golf (and all rotary sports really). We have metrics that allow us (TPI Certified) to know if you are in balance with upper body, lower body and core strength and power.

If have any questions, or would like to schedule your appointment, feel free to reach out!

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TPI Level 1 Movement Screen

Golf Fitness Training

I really enjoy everything I have learned and will continue to learn from Titleist Performance Institute (www.mytpi.com). All the information they have been able to compile on the body-swing relationship has really helped me to communicate to my clients and their golf instructors about potential issues and more importantly about how the body can be improved to help with swing efficiency.  As a Level 3 Golf Fitness Instructor, I have been educated and taken the time to work with my fellow Southern California section PGA golf instructors  to create a team atmosphere for my clients and their body related needs, couple that with over 15 years of experience in the industry and in my area, I am confident that I can help you identify and improve your movement ability. Schedule yourself an appointment for your evaluation!

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How do you practice?

Talking Movement and Golf Fitness

Roy Khoury speaking to the Southern California section PGA

How do you practice? Did you know that how you practice can affect how you learn? What we do can either help gain/retain skills or hinder your progress altogether. With that being said, there are a couple of different ways we can practice to acquire or improve a skill and they are:

Blocked Practice- Blocked practice is doing the same thing over and over again such as going to the driving range and hitting multiple driver shots. Blocked practice is a great way to learn a new skill since it gives the brain and body a single skill to process, but will quickly lose its effectiveness if over used.

Randomized Practice- Random practice is basically prating how you would play. SO you can either use playing a few holes as random practice or even practice different distance or direction shots with the same club. Random practice is more like actually playing golf, and actually helps you build the ability to problem solve while working on your skill.

When you are new to a sport or movement its good to challenge the left brain in repetition, logical and objective goal setting. When you are proficient with your task, random practice helps challenge the right brain and its creativity, thought and performance. That being said, both types of practice are helpful for acquiring and improving your game, they just access different parts of the brain and challenge you in different ways, so its good to understand both and how both can help you. See how it works for you!

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Functional Movement Screen (FMS)

In Line Lunge Test (FMS)

Check out this quick little video on the Functional Movement Screen, also known as the FMS. I like to use the FMS as a first place, or a starting point for anyone that is about to start a new workout routine as it quickly provides me with a lot of information in a fairly safe environment.  It’s appropriate for pretty much anyone whether you are just getting back into fitness, or coming back from a previous injury. Here’s a little bit about what I like about the test:

  1. It’s relatively safe as a starting point for a first session
  2. It provides a lot of valuable information for me to begin creating a program for a new client
  3. It’s valid and repeatable so we can retest and compare
  4. It gives me snapshot idea of how well you as a client can coordinate
  5. It gives me a snapshot idea of how well you as a client can comprehend instruction
  6. It’s a self limiting test meaning if you can’t do it, you generally will limit yourself and stop

Check out the video below to see what the test looks like, and let me know if you have any questions!

Contact us for your evaluation and lets see how well you move!

 

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2:1 Drill for Power

My friends over at the Southern California Golf Association (SCGA.com) asked me to help them out with some of their videos for their SCGA Tv and my friends over at Pelican Hill Golf Club allowed me to video on their driving range with Tim Mitchell (@TimMitchellPGA) to demonstrate one the first drills I might use with a golfer to develop lower body power in all three planes of movement.

roykhouryfitness


Roy Khoury of Roy Khoury Fitness taking Tim Mitchell through the 2:1 Drill

The drill we went over is called a 2:1 drill. The 2 refers to 2 quick continuous hops, followed by the 1 which refers to 1 controlled descent into a deeper squat. Why I like this drill is you are learning to load and unload the hips 2 times quickly followed by a controlled hold much like seen in the golf swing. While an argument can be made that other drills will ultimately produce more power- this drill is a great starting point to get into plyometrics that is relatively safe, and a great multi-planar warm up movement for a lower body day.

Now, that being said, I always suggest getting a movement evaluation from your local golf fitness instructor to help you refine your strengths and weaknesses because ultimately the goal is to get you where you need to go and for some this drill might be too easy, and others the drill might be too much. For an evaluation you can always contact me or find a local provider through the MyTPI website.

What I do like about the 2:1 drill is that we get to learn how coordinate ankles, knees, and hips in all three planes of motion which is what we do in our golf swing, and we get the hips to quickly load and unload which is something we need as golfers. To view the full video CLICK HERE and for more info check out my newly revamped website at www.roykhouryfitness.com.

@royfkhoury

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GOLF WRX ARTICLE

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My buddy Tim Mitchell is a golf instructor over at Pelican Hill Golf Resort in Newport Beach, CA and has on occasion contacts me to go see his students movement mechanics. Well a couple of months ago Tim emailed me some video a student that clearly understood what he wanted, but physically couldn’t execute – so Tim asked me to come out and evaluate. She continually would go into a reverse spine angle and that is not going to make for a good swing long term or healthy hip/spine mechaincs.

After seeing the video and knowing she is a pre-teen girl new to golf, I automatically thought of 2 things:

1) Does she have any previous injury history

2) Can her body handle the stability her swing is requiring of her

We went through a brief health history and previous injury intake with nothing to be concerned with and some formal testing in which we found poor stability in the side-to-side (lateral) and rotary movement planes, so I did some quick thinking and used a thera-band to trick her brain in to recognizing the need to brace (which you will see in the video below). After getting the feel of the band we had her hit a ball with the band on and her father commented that that was the first time he had ever seen her hit the ball straight!

Luckily, Tim was able to use that as a good teaching tool and I was able to see her for a few sessions to teach her some better movement mechanics and she is well on her way to a good swing and her goal of making the school team.
The link below will take you to Tim’s full article on Golf WRX and the video included below is a brief video description in which I tried to mimic her swing fault and the correction provided.

 

If you are a golfer and can’t figure out how to improve your swing- you need to look to your movement mechanics, take the time to find a TPI certified Trainer and get yourself checked out! Check back often for new articles!

 

Roy

 

The Value of a Team in Golf Instruction

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UPCOMING SEMINAR

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Attention Personal Trainers, Physical Therapist and Chiropractors

NeuroKinetic Therapy will be teaching a Level 1 course hosted by Joel Crandall at the Fit Fix Studio in Newport Beach, CA!

*We are currently working to provide those from out of town with a hotel solution near John Wayne and minutes from the Fit Fix Studio.  More details to come.

What is NKT:

NeuroKinetic Therapy corrective movement system, is a sophisticated assessment and treatment modality that addresses the causes of dysfunctional movement/coordination problems at their root in the motor control center in the cerebellum. The motor control center stores these patterns and directs their completion through the spinal cord and the muscles. The motor control center learns through failure.

Instructor:

Joel Crandall

When:

Saturday June 28th from 8am-4:30pm

Sunday June 29th from 8am-4:30pm

Where:

Fit Fix Studio, 3700 Campus Dr., Suite 100, Newport Beach, CA 92660

Course Info:

For detailed course info please see: Course Outlines

http://neurokinetictherapy.com/seminars/preparing-for-the-class

Payment Info: 

Early Registration: $600 if paid by 05/28/2014

Regular Registration: $700

http://neurokinetictherapy.com/seminars/upcoming-seminars-2

Click on 06/28-29 2014: Level 1 Two Day Course- Newport beach for payment options

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FOOT ACTION IN BACKSWING

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Last night I was working with a golf fitness client and we were talking about hip strategies (click here for a video example of a hip hinge with rotation) and how it relates to setup and backswing mechanics. After coaching his movement, we noticed his feet were not very stable and he was relying on his toes too much causing him to lose balance the same way he would in his downswing. That reminded of an article from Golf Digest titled “Jack Nicklaus: My Lifetime Principles For Great Golf”.

In the article Jack discussed his 6 principles that helped him through his golf career, and his 4th principle was on footwork.

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Jack quoted Jim Flick as saying holding the instep of your backfoot down keeps your right hip in check and I completely agree with that. Engaging the instep of the foot helps the hip stabilize in internal rotation (or in non-jibberish terms, working from your instep helps you pivot through the hip with sliding). In the same article Jack says ¦impact is a result of rolling your ankles back and forth which I also agree with. One drill I like using to teach this in is called Single Leg Hip Hinge with Rotation (seen below). What you will find in this drill is that as you hinge forward (first part of the drill) you need good balance throughout your foot, and as you rotation the hips open and closed (second part of the drill) you need to subtly roll your ankle very much in the same way you do in the golf swing to maintain control. If you have trouble with foot work, or sway/slide in your swing, I would suggest trying 5 repetitions on each side to build awareness of how the foot and hip relate to each other in rotation. Enjoy!

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(Click here for the video link)

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REFLEXIVE STABILITY

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Gray Cook (creator of the Functional Movement Screen and advisory board member of the Titleist Performance Institute) is a well recognized leader in the area of rehab, post rehab and performance training. I recently came across a great video clip that he put out regarding Stabilization Training. Its a quick video but its packed with a lot of great info. I use reflexive stability to help my golfers out all the time.  At the end of the day, golfers need to be in good alignment and a good position to have your brain reflexively fire to give you integrity. If you are out of position and your primary movers (aka mirror muscles) are firing to stabilize you, they cant do their job of moving leading to poor balance and mobility and ultimately compensation.

Check out the video below for some more info on it!

Enjoy!

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